What if you could create a small world in a container?


Have you ever seen one?  


If you have ever seen a terrarium, then you have.


Last week, as we arrived at the family farm for our weekly dinner gathering, I was greeted by the following sight when I entered the dining room…


The table had beautiful terrariums lined up in a row.

They were so beautiful and I wanted to share them with all of you, so I whipped out my cellphone to take some pictures for you.

Now you may wonder, whether or not my mother had spent a small fortune buying these beautiful arrangements.

Well, the answer is no.  She created them herself.


My mother has always had a special affinity for succulents and with her artistic eye, she creates stunning arrangements.


She creates tiny worlds using various succulents and arranging bits and pieces of things such as seashells, lichen, twigs, moss and pebbles.


These arrangements were prototypes that were to be photographed so she could use the pictures to apply for entry for a large holiday boutique held at a local church.


Two of these beautiful terrariums were then being taken to California as gifts for her sisters.

Last year, she made me a lovely terrarium…

Chopsticks are a great tool for placing items inside a terrarium.

Terrariums are quite expensive if you buy them at the store.  

But, you can create your own small living world yourself.  Believe it or not, my mother got all of her containers at the local Goodwill store.  

Pebbles and moss can always be purchased at the local craft store.  But, you can also gather many items for terrariums such as twigs, lichen, small rocks, etc. the next time you take a nature walk.

If you would like to learn how to create your own terrarium; I wrote a “how to” post for Birds & Blooms that you can see here.
Noelle Johnson, aka, 'AZ Plant Lady' is a horticulturist, certified arborist, and landscape consultant who helps people learn how to create, grow, and maintain beautiful desert gardens that thrive in a hot, dry climate. She does this through her consulting services, her online class Desert Gardening 101, and her monthly membership club, Through the Garden Gate. As she likes to tell desert-dwellers, "Gardening in the desert isn't hard, but it is different."

3 replies
  1. James Missier
    James Missier says:

    I have seen many terrarium arrangements and I find this quite interesting and beautiful.

    The practical side of it is that they are succulents – which means they are slow growers.
    I like the idea of eggs – its a new one to me.

    Reply
  2. Gardens at Waters East
    Gardens at Waters East says:

    Noelle, Nice to see other's indoor plantings. I have to bring most of my succulents inside in the winter or they will die here on the shore. (Today and the whole next week we will be lucky to get above 0 degrees F) I have many pots in the sunroom at this time – looks like your southwest desert!! Jack

    Reply

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