*Disclosure: I was given a free copy of this book in return for my honest review.

While I wouldn’t describe myself as someone who succumbs to the latest trends, that isn’t true when it comes to gardening.  I am always on the lookout for new ways to grow plants – especially those that I can eat 🙂

Talk to someone who grows vegetables in their garden and you are likely to find yourself engaged in a passionate conversation about different vegetables – what grows well, what doesn’t, and favorite ways to prepare them.

Growing microgreens are one of the newer garden trends that have rapidly captured the interest of home gardeners – me included!

This is especially true after reading the book, Microgreens: How to Grow Nature’s Superfood.  I can’t tell you how excited about this new book and how it is inspiring me to plant shallow bowls of microgreens in front of my sunny kitchen window.

 
Speaking of microgreens, do you know what they are?  
 
  Microgreens are seedlings of plants such as broccoli, cabbage, kale, lentils, mustard, peas and radish.  The seedlings have the delicate flavor of the mature plant yet only take 7 – 21 days to grow. 
 
They not only taste delicious but can be grown indoors or outside.  Imagine young kale or radish microgreens sprinkled in salads, in sandwiches, or in your favorite smoothie – and that’s just for starters.
 
 
Inside the cover, the author, Fionna Hill, dives right in talking about what microgreens are and why they aren’t considered to be sprouts and reasons why you should try growing your own.
 
 
Then she goes even further by titillating your taste buds by describing the taste of microgreens.  She describes the flavor of each type such as young basil, celery, kale, mustard, and radish.
 
 
Growing microgreens is easy to do and Fiona gives clear instructions on how to grow your own. I like that she includes a helpful chapter on how kids can grow them as well.  Just think of how growing microgreens can help your children to develop a lifelong love of gardening as well as  eat food that is good for them.  
 
If you are interested in participating in one of the newest gardening trends, then you’ll want to get this book.
 
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You can enter to win a free copy of Microgreens, How to Grow Nature’s Own Superfood.
 
1. To enter, simply leave me a comment about what fruits and/or vegetables that you like to grow and eat or if you have ever tried microgreens.
(Be sure to leave your email address if it’s not on your profile, or I won’t have any way to contact you.)
 
2. For a bonus entry, like me on Facebook or follow me on Twitter – (be sure to let me know in your comment).
 
Let your friends know about this great giveaway and I will pick a random winner on Monday, February 22nd.
 
You can also order your own copy of Microgreens, How to Grow Nature’s Own Superfood by clicking here.


*I was given a copy of this book free of charge for my honest review.
Noelle Johnson, aka, 'AZ Plant Lady' is a horticulturist, certified arborist, and landscape consultant who helps people learn how to create, grow, and maintain beautiful desert gardens that thrive in a hot, dry climate. She does this through her consulting services, her online class Desert Gardening 101, and her monthly membership club, Through the Garden Gate. As she likes to tell desert-dwellers, "Gardening in the desert isn't hard, but it is different."

8 replies
  1. pegplant
    pegplant says:

    Would love to win the Microgreens book, am interested in growing edibles and here in No. Virginia, microgreens can be grown indoors in winter. In summer, would love to grow more berries for fruit. Just discovered your site as I am posting to May Dreams Gardens' Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, will follow you on twitter and facebook, good luck with your 2016 gardening season!
    Peggy
    Pegplant@yahoo.com
    //www.pegplant.com

    Reply
  2. Indie
    Indie says:

    I've grown microgreens before and enjoy doing so. My main problem with growing them is finding a place to put them where they will grow without me neglecting them but also where my cat won't eat them. They are so delicious though!

    Reply

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