Okay, you are probably wondering what on earth I am talking about when I mention a toad, Star Wars and a chicken coop in a single post.  And if you aren’t curious…..you can stop here 😉


This is a story of a toad that is called “Jabba the Hut” after the infamous Star Wars character who lives in a chicken coop.  My post title makes sense now, doesn’t it?


Both of my nephews are extreme Star Wars fans and love collecting the Star Wars Lego figurines.  My youngest nephew is only 3 years old and he named the toad, “Jabba the Hut”



So, where exactly does Jabba the Hut live exactly?


He lives in a moist area by the Elm tree.



Can you see him?



 The chickens don’t seem to mind him sharing their yard.

Jabba the Hut likes to burrow into the moist soil during the day and comes out at night.
It was still hard to really see him and so I tried to coax him out…



If you have never seen a toad looking cranky, here is your chance.

Jabba definitely did not enjoy all of the attention…..I think we woke him up a bit early.


I am a strong proponent of leaving wild animals alone, but I think I failed in this instance in my desire to take some pictures of Jabba to share with all of you.

He definitely did not enjoy all of the attention…..


I think that he decided to start his night time escapades early and get away from us.




 You can why my nephew thought of the name “Jabba the Hut”.  There is definitely a resemblance 😉




***More about “Jabba theHut”***

Mr. Toad is a Sonoran Desert Toad.  They are quite active during our summer monsoon season.
They eat quite a lot of insects and keep to themselves.  Do not pick them up, since they secrete a poisonous substance through their skin.  Be sure to wash your hands thoroughly if you do happen to touch one.

When we lived in Phoenix, we saw quite a few toads during the summer months.  It wasn’t unusual to see 3 to 5 in our front yard.  We lived in a neighborhood that had flood irrigation, which may have been why we had so many.
So, have you seen any toads out and about?
Noelle Johnson, aka, 'AZ Plant Lady' is a horticulturist, certified arborist, and landscape consultant who helps people learn how to create, grow, and maintain beautiful desert gardens that thrive in a hot, dry climate. She does this through her consulting services, her online class Desert Gardening 101, and her monthly membership club, Through the Garden Gate. As she likes to tell desert-dwellers, "Gardening in the desert isn't hard, but it is different."

5 replies
  1. David
    David says:

    Yes, that title DID catch my attention. I hope Jabba does well wherever he roams. Great chicken shot. I'll be posting my chicken coop building experience soon. It's a comedy.
    David/ Tropical tExaNa/ 🙂

    Reply
  2. FlowerLady
    FlowerLady says:

    What a great fun post! I clicked on the larger picture when you asked if we could spot Jabba, and figured he must be the bit of greenish color. Amazing seeing how big he really is, as he was just a tad bit of green mixed in with all of that brown.

    Love the coop and it's wonderful that you live so close to the farm.

    Have a wonderful weekend ~ FlowerLady

    Reply
  3. Balisha
    Balisha says:

    We used to have a wood pile where toads lived. My Grand kids always went right to that wood pile when they came to my house. I have a toad here, who lives in my little front garden. He loves to be sprinkled with water, when I water the flowers. I worry about him with the snake that I have seen. Yes indeed, your toad looks like Jabba. Balisha

    Reply
  4. Rohrerbot
    Rohrerbot says:

    Great title and a fun post….I love trying to find the frogs….the blend in so well! I love when wildlife lives in the neighborhood….especially frogs and toads. I think that's one of the biggest compliments a gardener can get from Mother Nature for doing a good job. No frogs for me in downtown Tucson…..but hosting oodles of hummingbirds and other nesting birds with lots of butterflies and lizards.

    Reply

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