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Day 6 of our road trip began with gray, dreary skies and a chilly breeze.  


We decided to spend our time in Madison, Wisconsin by seeing the Olbrich Botanical Gardens, which were rated as the #1 attraction by Trip Advisor.


As we left our hotel, we were faced by roads under construction.  



Summer is the time for all road construction throughout the midwest because cold, wintery conditions are not conducive to construction.


Once we arrived at the gardens, we were greeted by the sight of containers filled with a combination of edible and ornamental plants.

I love how the blue of the lobelia contrasts with the bright green of the parsley and ‘Red Sail’ lettuce.


Cabbage is one of my favorite edible plants to add to containers.  

All of these edible plants can be grown in pots in my southwestern garden, but are planted in fall, not spring like in Wisconsin.

During this trip, we have visited three botanical gardens and have not spent one dime on admission fees.

Why?

Most major botanical gardens have a reciprocal admissions if you belong as long as you are a member of your local botanical garden and they are part of the reciprocal program.
At first glance, the gardens were beautiful and I couldn’t wait to start exploring.


The gardens have bee hives located in out of the way areas, which are filled with Italian bees that are said to be rather docile.

The bees play an important part in pollinating the flowering plants throughout the gardens.  The honey that is sometimes sold in the garden gift store


The individual gardens are spaced around ‘The Great Lawn’ which is a large circular grass area where concerts are held.  

The first garden I explored was the ‘Meadow Garden’.  This garden is sustainable and very low-maintenance.  

It is filled with drought-tolerant grasses along with wildflowers and flowering bulbs.  What I really liked about the garden is that it does not need supplemental water or fertilizer.  

Maintenance is limited to mowing twice a year.

What I didn’t like about the garden, was the mosquitos.  But, I came prepared and they mostly left me alone.


Walking on, I wanted to explore the herb garden because they play a huge part in my own garden.  


The entry to the herb garden is quite formal.  Boxwood hedges border the center garden area.


Edible plants combine with ornamentals for beautiful container plantings.


I love flowering chives and how they used them as a border.

Varieties of mint and thyme were nicely displayed and the herb garden also had herbs used for dyes.

*The brown plants in the background are recovering from the severe winter with new green growth slowly coming back.




This bed of flowering annuals was completed edged in flowering chives.



A Thai pavilion dominated the center of the Thai garden, which brought back memories for my mother who spent a few months in Thailand as a young woman.
While tropical plants cannot survive a midwest winter – the plants used in this area had a tropical appearance with large leaves while also being cold-hardy.


The bridge that connects the Thai Garden to the rest of the garden, crosses over Starkweather Creek, which bisects the garden.


People can canoe or kayak up 5 miles from this side of the bridge.



Boats can dock on the other side of the bridge and the creek leads out to Lake Monona.




This area is called the Sunken Garden, which is gently sloped so that rainwater flows toward the lake.




The formal water feature was flanked by two container plantings, which were quite contemporary in style.




The pond had beautiful yellow and purple flowering Japanese iris.




Vines were used in different ways throughout the garden.


A tree provided needed support for a clematis vine with its maroon flowers.




 Years ago, I tried growing clematis in our first home.  It did grow, but never flowered.  I learned later that it gets too hot in the desert for clematis.




Another clematis was flowering next to a beautiful host underneath a tree.




I love pink flowers, don’t you?




Wisteria was growing up on arbors and I never tire of viewing their lovely flowers and inhaling their heavenly fragrance.




The vision of a rose climbing upward always makes me want to go home and grow one up the side of my house.


Have you ever heard of ‘Paper Birch’ trees?

Their bark peels off in perfect sheets that is sometimes used to wrap around decorative candles.

I have always had a special place in my heart for birch trees.  Growing up in a Los Angeles suburb, we had three growing in our front yard.  I have always loved their white bark and bright-green leaves.


Underneath these birch trees was an interesting ornamental grass called dormitor quaking sedge (Carex brizoides).  I like how it lays down making it look like green waves underneath the trees.


 Walking near the Perennial Garden, I spotted a blue-flowering plant that looked rather familiar.


It turned out to be a blue-flowering variety of autumn sage (Salvia greggii), ‘Blue Note’.


Can you imagine how patriotic a planting of red, white and blue autumn sage plants would look?


Here is another lovely edible, ornamental container that caught my eye, using kale.


Don’t you just want to sit down and relax in this area?


Pale-pink bee balm (Monarda species)  was the only flower in this area of the garden, but it was more then enough alongside the ornamental grasses.


Sometimes less is more.




Walking on a paved area, I saw a planting of perennials right in the middle.  


Interestingly, there was no border or any clearly delineated space.  Just an opening without pavers where plants seemingly come up in the middle of a sea of pavers.


I kind of like this idea.  How about you?




If you have been reading my road trip posts, then you have probably noticed my obsession with peonies, which don’t grow in the desert.


Wherever we go, I see shrubs covered with gorgeous blooms.  




Well, Olbrich Gardens were no exception.


I must have taken over 100 photos of all the different blooming peony varieties that they had.




From a distance, peonies resemble bushes filled with roses.


However, once you get closer, you notice the the leaves have a different shape and so do the unopened blossoms, which are shaped into balls.




Their petals tend to be more ruffled then roses.




And, their blossoms are huge!


We spent a lovely morning in the gardens, but it was time to hit the road for our next destination.


On my way out, I noticed an outdoor eating area with centerpieces made from plants that I was quite familiar with…




(Agave americana var. medio picta) was the center point of numerous succulent containers.


It wasn’t unusual to see succulent plants in many of the gardens we visited.  While they do fine in the summer months, they need to be brought indoors and protected during the cold months of the year.


 After taking 334 pictures of the gardens (seriously), it was time to hit the road.


Whenever possible, we try to stay off of main highways and focus on using smaller highways that run through small towns and countryside.

The Wisconsin countryside is green.  I mean really green!


Dairy farms dotted the landscape along with beautiful scenery.  We thoroughly enjoyed our journey.



Tomorrow, we spend time along the towns by the Mississippi River before heading toward Minnesota Amish country.


**I wanted to thank those of you who have left such wonderful comments.  I appreciate them so much!

One of my favorite stops on our road trip this year was visiting the gardens at the University of Tennessee.



Earlier in our trip, I visited the gardens of the University of South Carolina, so I was looking forward to seeing more campus gardens.

Even though, I had heard great things about the gardens at UT, I was surprised at how much there was to see. 


The kitchen gardens were the first area we came up to.



The kitchen garden was bordered by trash cans filled with flowering annuals and tulips.



Roses and a clematis vine greeted us at the entrance of the kitchen garden.


I wish I could grow clematis vines in Arizona.  I tried once – it did grow, but wouldn’t flower.  Definitely NOT a ‘fuss-free’ plant for a desert garden.


The fence was made up of tree stakes, sawed in half and painted lavender.  The area inside was filled with vegetables, herbs and other plants.  The garden was a also a test garden for many yet to be released plant varieties.


Here is a strawberry with red flowers, called ‘Toscana’.


Garlic planted among leaf lettuce look so attractive, don’t you think?


Did you know that garlic keeps bad bugs away from the lettuce?  It’s true!


Here is a great example of ‘square-foot gardening‘.



Flowering chives were just a few of the herbs that bordered the outer area of the garden.


The flowers are so pretty, that I think I’ll let some of my chives go to flower this year.


The artichoke plants were huge – my mother posed beside it so you could see how big it was.


Some of the beds were full of what many would call weeds.  But this crop of ‘hairy vetch’ is actually a cover crop, which is planted in between seasons because it adds nitrogen to the soil.


Have you heard of the newest trend of vertical gardening?  I love this display.



Of course, a kitchen garden should have a compost pile.


Do you see the plastic tube in the middle?  That is perforated all the way down, in order to get air to all layers of the compost pile, which helps with decomposition.


Outside of the kitchen garden was an old, rusty truck that had potatoes growing in its bed.


This was a great example of what I like to call ‘functional garden art’.


Here is a cute praying mantis figure.


I did see some familiar plants that are equally at home in the desert southwest like this prickly pear and verbena (Glandularia pulchella), below.


After leaving the kitchen gardens, I walked through the larger part of the university gardens.



One of the things that I enjoy about traveling, is discovering new plants that don’t grow where I live.  


Viewing this garden, I was often surprised to find quite a few plants that I also grow, even though my garden was about 1,800 miles away from here.


As I walked through the larger garden, there were beautiful shade plants, like these hosta.


Brightly colored azaleas dotted the landscape.



Isn’t this ‘Encore’ azalea beautiful?


Lily of-the-Valley was blooming.  I love their small, delicate flowers.


I love the lime-green color of this hosta, don’t you?


This honeysuckle smelled heavenly!


It was so pretty, too.


We also found a huge wisteria vine, which also had a wonderful fragrance.


The dogwood trees were blooming.

Did you know that the outer white petals aren’t the actual flower?  They are called ‘brachts’.  The real flower is in the center and isn’t too showy.






Willowleaf ‘Blue Star’ was in full bloom.  



Throughout the lawn areas were softly mounded planting beds, which I liked because they added height and interest to this large expanse of lawn.


From a distance, I could see a red-flowering plant. I walked closer to see what it was…


I was surprised to find that it was Red Clover (Trifolium rubens).  It was very pretty, but you need to be careful when using it as a groundcover, because like other clovers; it can be invasive.


As we got ready to leave the garden, we walked through the shade garden, which had places to sit and eat.

The UT Gardens have so many different events for the public.  I only wished that I lived closer 🙂


I encourage you to take some time and visit the gardens at your local university.  You may be pleasantly surprised at what you find there.


Our trip is nearing its end, but I am looking forward to visiting Kentucky.


****************

“Thank you” to my friend, Dave Townsend (from Tennessee) who sent me to this wonderful garden.  

I encourage you to visit Dave’s blog, Growing the Home Garden, which is a hugely popular blog – once you visit, you’ll see why.