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Spring in the desert brings a flurry of activity out in the garden – much of it involving container gardening.
 
As they say, in late spring, it’s “out with the old and in with the new.” In the desert garden, it’s when cool-season flowering annuals are traded out for those that can handle the hot temperatures of summer.  
 
Examples of cool-season annuals are pansies, petunias, and snapdragons, which are grown fall through spring. BUT, they won’t survive hot, desert summers. So, in late April, it’s time to plant flowering annuals that can take the heat. My favorites include angelonia, ‘Blue Victoria’ salvia, and vinca.
While flowers are a popular pot filler, there are so many other things that you can do with growing plants in containers.
Here are some of my favorites:


Jazz up the appearance of your containers by painting them a different color.

 
 
Let’s face it – beautiful containers can be expensive while inexpensive plastic containers are a bit boring. I like to dress up my plastic containers by adding a coat of paint.  
 
Many spray paints can be used on plastic and last a long time. I have several painted pots in my garden that add a welcome splash of color.
 

Grow herbs and vegetables along with flowers in pots.

 
Leaf lettuce and garlic grow along with flowering petunias.
 
Did you know that you can grow vegetables in pots? I love doing this in my garden. In the fall, I plant leaf lettuce, spinach, and garlic in my large pots alongside flowering petunias. When March arrives, I like to add basil, peppers along with annuals.
 
Winter container garden with spinach, parsley and garlic growing with pink petunias.
 
For pots, I recommend you use a potting mix, which is specially formulated for containers and holds just the right amount of moisture.  
 
Container plants need to be fertilizer. You can use a slow-release fertilizer or a liquid fertilizer of your choice.
 
Cucumbers growing with vinca and dianthus.
 
In spring, vegetables such as cucumbers, bush beans, and even zucchini can grow in containers paired with flowers. 
 
*If you would like to try growing edible containers, click here for more info.
 

Plant succulents for a low-maintenance container.

 
 
My favorite filler for containers in the desert garden is cacti and succulents. They do very well in pots and need less water than those filled with flowering annuals and perennials.
 
Desert Spoon (Dasylirion wheeleri).
Succulents are an excellent choice for planting in areas where water is not easily accessible. While they will need supplemental water, they don’t need water every day, making them a better choice for these areas.
 
 
In general, succulents are lower-maintenance as well, so they are an excellent choice for the ‘fuss-free’ gardener.
 
Use a potting mix specially formulated for cactus & succulents, which will drain well.
 
Fertilize succulents spring through fall using a liquid or slow-release fertilizer at 1/2 the recommended strength.
 
*For more information on how to plant succulents in containers, including how to do it without getting pricked, click here.
 

Fill the bottom space of large pots with empty, plastic containers. 

 
 
Let’s face it – potting mix is expensive and makes your pots very heavy. If you have a large pot, your plant’s roots most likely will never reach the bottom – so why waste soil where you don’t need it?
 
Fill up the unused space with recycled plastic containers and then add your potting mix. You will save money, AND your container will be much lighter as well. 
Whether you are new to gardening, an experienced pro, or have a small or large garden space – I invite you to reimagine what you can do in a container!

You’ll probably never guess what I am growing in a recyclable bag…

Lettuce!
So what made me think of growing lettuce in a grocery bag?
Well, it wasn’t my idea.  I actually saw an article about it and thought it would be fun to try in my own garden and share with you.
Here is how I did it:
I took my recyclable grocery bag and made a few little holes on the bottom, using scissors, for drainage.
Then I placed the bag where I wanted in the garden.  It is hard to move after you fill it with soil.
I filled the bag with planting mix and then planted my lettuce transplants.  Of course, you can simply plant lettuce seeds instead.
Add slow-release fertilizer because all vegetables need fertile soil.
Then water.  I simply put a drip emitter on my new lettuce planter. 
I love how it looks and just a few weeks after planting, I can already pick lettuce.
So how about you?  Is this something you would like to try? 

*This blog post contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase, I may receive a commission (at no additional cost to you). Thanks for your support in this way.*

Last winter, I was enjoying a rare moment of peace….no kids or husband in the house, the garden didn’t need any attention and no articles to write. So, I decided to see what was on television.  As I was channel surfing, I saw a gardening show and of course, I stopped and watched.

What I saw was the host and featured garden expert, showing how to grow vegetables and flowers together in containers. Since I love both vegetables and flowers, I was intrigued.  So I bought the book written by the featured garden expert and got started.


I found nice plastic containers on sale along with some tiny trellises, as well as planting mix (NOT potting soil, which gets too soggy for container plants).
Planting mix is specially formulated for containers – it has a light texture and holds just the right amount of moisture for plants.


Then, I started planting.  I came up with the vegetable and flower combinations on my own and I must admit that I was happy how they turned out…




The first container has purple violas, spinach, bell pepper plant and nasturtiums. I started all of these from transplants, except for the nasturtiums, which came from seed that I planted.
 
I periodically snip the spinach for salads and I have harvested a single bell pepper so far.  However, there are flowers on my pepper plant, so more peppers are on the way.
 
 
This container was planted with red and green leaf lettuce, pink dianthus and cucumbers.
 
I snip the lettuce for salad and the dianthus has been blooming nonstop. The only problem that I have had with this container are the cucumbers.
 
Cucumbers do best when started from seed, not transplants.  I have grown a lot of cucumbers over the years.  So, I placed two small trellises in the back of the container and planted cucumber seeds at their base. I picked a variety of cucumbers that were small and would do well in a container.
 
Unfortunately, they never came up.
 
I tried planting them in my regular vegetable garden and they never came up.
 
I tried starting them indoors and they didn’t sprout.
*I had purchased the seeds online from a very reputable seed company, but the entire package of seeds was defective. 
 
So I planted my go-to cucumber seeds and they are starting to grow beautifully.

 

My last vegetable/flower container has romaine lettuce, sugar snap peas and Icelandic poppies.
 
The lettuce has done very well, BUT my little dog discovered that he likes lettuce, and he would take some little bites from the sides of the lettuce.  I simply put some plastic patio chairs around the pot and he kept away.  Later, I took the chairs away and he left the lettuce alone.
 
The poppies haven’t bloomed yet, but I can see their buds, so it won’t be long now.

I have been picking off sugar snap peas every time I am in the garden and eating them on the spot.
 
So, does the idea of growing vegetables and flowers together appeal to you?
 
The book I read was “Easy Container Combos: Vegetables and Flowers” by Pamela Crawford. (I haven’t been asked to promote her book – I bought it myself and really enjoyed it so much). 
 
I can’t wait to try some different combos this summer once the lettuce fades away.  I promise I will share 🙂
 
**One thing I love so much about gardening is trying new things. This one was a home run for me.