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Like many women, I have not outgrown my teenage love affair with the color pink. However, instead of painting the walls of my room a vibrant shade of pink or wearing a fluorescent t-shirt, I now content myself with using it in the garden.

Queen’s wreath vine (Antigonon leptopus) lazily climbs its way up the trunk of my cascalote tree where it sends forth sprays of pink blossoms. I love that its buds are heart-shaped as are the lush green leaves. 

Although it will die back to the ground in winter, I look forward to it re-emerging in spring as it begins its ascent up the trunk of my tree.

*Have you ever grown a queen’s wreath vine? For more information, you can read my earlier post about this pink beauty.

 

Who doesn’t like ‘natural beauty’?  I have a renewed appreciation for my ‘natural beauties’ out in the garden during the summer months.  Now, I realize that there are some who do enjoy the satisfaction of working hard with their plants and being rewarded with a beautiful display and I think that is great.  But for me, the last thing I want to do is have to fuss over a plant in the middle of the summer heat so that it will look beautiful for me.  I would much rather enjoy the ‘natural beauty’ of my summer plants looking through the windows from the comfort of my air-conditioned home.


Earlier this summer, I wrote about one of my favorite ‘natural beauties’ in the garden, Yellow Bells.  Today, I would like to introduce you to one of my favorite summer vines which is a wonderful example of ‘natural beauty.’

Queen’s Wreath vines grace the Arizona State University campus.
 
Queen Wreath Vine (Antigonon leptopus) is a colorful asset to my garden This ‘natural beauty’ is a vine that is native to Mexico and Central America.  Stunning pink sprays of flowers appear in spring and last until the first frost.  *In tropical areas, it can be considered invasive, but here in the desert, it is easily managed.
 
 
In our desert climate, they do require supplemental water, but no fertilizer is needed.  Bees are attracted to the beautiful flowers, and I love the pretty heart-shaped leaves. 
 
 A wall of Queen’s Wreath at ASU
 
Queen’s Wreath is a robust vine.  It can grow in full sun including areas of reflected heat.  It will also grow in light shade although flowering will be reduced.   
 
The only maintenance required in my garden is pruning it back in winter once it dies back after the first frost.  However the roots are hardy to 20 degrees F, and in the spring, it quickly grows back with a trellis, fence or an arbor for support.

**My first experience with queen’s wreath was in our first home in Phoenix, where there was a support made up of twine tied between two palm trees.  We had no idea why it was there, but it sure looked ugly.  Well, before we had time to remove the twine, beautiful, light green, heart-shaped leaves began climbing up the support and quickly covered it.  Gorgeous sprays of pink flowers rapidly followed, which was a pleasant surprise.  




What natural beauties are enjoying in your garden this month?  
I will be sharing another favorite ‘natural beauty’ from my garden soon.